12 9 / 2014

10 9 / 2014

Last month we announced our inaugural shortlist for the Readings New Australian Writing Award! To celebrate the shortlist, we’ve asked each of our six shortlisted authors five quick questions.

Christine Piper, author of After Darkness, says:

'Write what you know' is a common piece of advice doled out to beginner writers, and it’s extremely limiting. … I’d say, 'Write about what interests you, and what you’d like to know more about'.

Luke Carman, author of An Elegant Young Man, says:

Alexis Wright’s The Swan Book would be one of the only three books that would always be kept on the shelves at his bookshop.

Maxine Beneba Clarke, author of Foreign Soil, says:

My own bookstore would be a catastrophic, commercial disaster. … reading beds with feather doonas scattered throughout and a coffee shop with an award-winning barrister and magnificent pastry chef.

Fiona McFarlane, author of The Night Guest, says:

I find (listening to music while I work) distracting. But if I’m having trouble writing, I often stop trying and listen to Bach for a while. He seems to filter my brain.

Ceridwen Dovey, author of Only the Animals, says:

If Only the Animals was ever made a film, I can’t help but think that Seth Rogen would be perfect for the voice of the freewheeling mussel that dies in Pearl Harbor. 

Michael Mohammed Ahmad, author of The Tribe, says:

I grew up in an environment where the people around me were not fortunate enough to have literature and even basic literacy in their lives. It was not a book that made me want to be a writer. It was the absence of books that did it for me.

09 9 / 2014

Sam Vincent on gonzo ethnography in Blood and Guts:

Over the summer of 2012-13 I sailed to Antarctica with the zealously vegan crew of Sea Shepherd’s flagship, the Steve Irwin – an experience that would form the (fake) meat of my book on the whaling controversy.

Sam Vincent on gonzo ethnography in Blood and Guts:

Over the summer of 2012-13 I sailed to Antarctica with the zealously vegan crew of Sea Shepherd’s flagship, the Steve Irwin – an experience that would form the (fake) meat of my book on the whaling controversy.

09 9 / 2014

Ann Le Lievre, our School and Libraries Liaison, describes seeing Tim Cope, author of On the Trail of Genghis Khan: an Epic Journey Through the Land of the Nomads, at this year’s Melbourne Writers Festival:

The audience sat mesmerised as Tim described through words and image, the journey he made through the landscape of the Eurasian steppe.Tim grew up in rural Victoria and as a young boy he nurtured a love of horizons. This continued to linger in his imagination and became the inspiration for his journey. He spoke also of his love for his horses, a connection that was imperative to his daily ritual, and at times critical to his survival. He also spoke of Tig, his young travel companion and best friend. To the delight of us all he called to Tig, who then casually came out from behind the stage and befriended the audience with his gravity and size, allowing the occasional pat.

Ann Le Lievre, our School and Libraries Liaison, describes seeing Tim Cope, author of On the Trail of Genghis Khan: an Epic Journey Through the Land of the Nomads, at this year’s Melbourne Writers Festival:

The audience sat mesmerised as Tim described through words and image, the journey he made through the landscape of the Eurasian steppe.Tim grew up in rural Victoria and as a young boy he nurtured a love of horizons. This continued to linger in his imagination and became the inspiration for his journey. He spoke also of his love for his horses, a connection that was imperative to his daily ritual, and at times critical to his survival. He also spoke of Tig, his young travel companion and best friend. To the delight of us all he called to Tig, who then casually came out from behind the stage and befriended the audience with his gravity and size, allowing the occasional pat.

08 9 / 2014

We chat with bookseller Alexandra Mathew about her love of immersive books and classical music.

We chat with bookseller Alexandra Mathew about her love of immersive books and classical music.

08 9 / 2014

"Many learned persons will disagree with me, but I think Monkey Grip, first published in 1977, was the first time a lot of hot, fresh, plain Australian language and behaviour really coexisted with literature."

07 9 / 2014

06 9 / 2014